Apr 21, 2014, 12:36 am (BST)
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Iron-enriched tube well water reduces risk of anemia
 
GAIBANDHA, Sept 25 (BSS) - In a recent research conducted by
Johns Hopkins University -Bangladesh (JHU- B) at the command area
of JiVitA Project, it was found that level of iron has increased
in the body of women because of drinking iron-enriched tube well
water.

"Anemia is a major health problem among the mothers and the
children and it can lead to fatigue and weakness, and many other
health problems, especially during the pregnancy. It is widely
assumed that anemia is due to iron deficiency but this is not
always so", the findings of the research said.

The findings of the research were disclosed by Dr. Rebeka
Meril, adviser of JiVitA project, to a group of journalists at
the head office of the project in the district town here on
Monday.

Where iron-enriched tube well water was consumed, iron
deficiency related disease 'anemia' was not found there. In that
place, anemia may have resulted from deficiencies of other micro
nutrients, genetic conditions (thalassemia or hemoglobinopathies)
or infectious diseases, the findings said.

These findings from Gaibandha implied that where high level
iron are available in the tube wells water, routine iron
supplementation may not be helpful in treating anemia, she said.

Though the main source of iron is tube well water to the
women and their family members in many rural areas of the
country, iron-enriched water of tube well was not evaluated
properly as a source of required iron, she added.

The findings had already been published in the Journal of
Nutrition, the international Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition
Research, and the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
while the United States Agency for International Development, the
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and a proctor and Gamble
Fellowship provided the fund for this work, she further added.

The JHU-B, which is an international NGO affiliated with
Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland (USA),
facilitates a number of public health research projects and
programmes in Bangladesh and is working closely with government
agencies and local academic and NGO partners.

JiVitA, one of its research projects, has been conducting
large-scale research since 2001 in Gaibandha and Rangpur
districts of the country designed to explore intervention to
reduce maternal, neonatal and child mortality supporting the
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, source said.
 
 
 
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